The New Contour? All About Blush Draping

The 80s. A decade of garish colours, cheesy music and some seriously questionable fashion. Despite its fall backs, the 80s was, without a doubt, an epic era (slightly biased opinion being an 80s baby myself).

When it comes to beauty trends, however, the 80s isn’t necessarily the era which you would want to take any inspiration. Case in point – hair crimping. I need not explain what hair crimping is, because anyone over the age of 25 will know and loathe it well. Let’s just say, we’ve all been there and we all regret it. However, despite our initial thoughts, there are a few beauty trends from the 80s; which are set to make a huge comeback for Spring 2017.

Along with the rest of the face, blush application was pretty intense during the 80s. Women would layer on lashings of brightly coloured blush to emphasis their bone structure and further accentuate their facial features. A high concentration of blush would be applied from the top of the cheekbones and blended into the apples of the cheeks. Slightly topsy turvy in today’s world where it’s normally the other way around. Nevertheless, blush colours would often consist of bright, neon pinks to add an air of femininity and elegance. Fast forward a few decades and it seems as though heavy blush, or rather, blush draping (as it’s lovingly renamed) has made a huge comeback and it’s looking to knock contouring off its pedastal.

Unlike contouring, blush draping is used to add youth and freshness to a look. Contouring, particularly when done incorrectly, can often make a person look harsh and over-done. Blush draping is created with the use of duo-toned blushers (or a shade selection from a palette) to create a sculpted, yet soft structure to the face. A lot more forgiving for women of age and not to mention, a lot less time consuming than most contour routines!

So what’s the technique? Well rather than applying a contour shade in the hollows of your cheekbones, a darker toned blush is applied just under the cheek and blended into the temples and hair line using a lighter shade of blush. It’s certainly not as heavily applied as women would often do in the 80s, but the method of applying your blush right up to your eyebrows is still pretty much the same. This creates a ‘lifted’ look to the face and gives the illusion of higher cheekbones and therefore a slimmer, more structured face.

Sounds simple enough, but I’m not sure it will make ladies want to through out their favourite cool-toned bronzer anytime soon. It does, however, make the face appear a lot more youthful and bright (particularly if you use a coral/peach toned blush palette). The Marc Jacob’s Air Blush palettes (£28.00) are perfect for blush draping and provide everything you need in one handy compact for easy travelling.

I, for one, am pretty excited about this trend as I never contour my face on a day to day basis and blush draping seems like a reasonably simple alternative to adding structure to the face. Maybe there is a light at the end of the contour and highlight tunnel after all!

What’s your favourite or worst beauty trend from the 80s? Have you tried blush draping. Comment below with your thoughts!